Events

Please find below a list of some of the activities (talks, seminars, workshops, etc.) carried out at our center during the last seven years.

July – September 2019

April – June 2019

January – March 2019

October – December 2018

July – September 2018

April – June 2018

January – March 2018

October – December 2017

April – June 2017

January – March 2017

October – December 2016

April – June 2016

January – March 2016

October – December 2015

July -September 2015

April – June 2015

January – March 2015

October – December 2014

July – September 2014

April – June 2014

January – March 2014

October – December 2013

July – September 2013

April – June 2013

January -March 2013

 October – December 2012

July – September 2012

April – June 2012

January – March 2012

October – December 2011

 

 

 

Sep
27
Fri
IAS-Research Talk by Neda Maki (University of Toronto): “: Autism in the Canadian Arctic: how might Inuit traditional knowledge Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ), and Elders’ teachings inform Western biomedical understandings of Autism etiology and associated challenging behaviours?”
Sep 27 @ 11:30 – 13:30

Autism in the Canadian Arctic: how might Inuit traditional knowledge Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ), and Elders’ teachings inform Western biomedical understandings of Autism etiology and associated challenging behaviours?

Abstract:
Limited data are available on how Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affects Inuit families living in remote Arctic communities in Nunavut (NU). In Canada, 1 in 66 children is diagnosed with ASD. A neurodevelopmental condition, ASD is characterized by impediments in communication and social interaction. A significant primary health concern due to its life-altering impact on families and the high cost to society of providing supportive ASD services. While there are robust autism programs available in some Canadian jurisdictions, no specific programs exist in NU. Nunavummiut (inhabitants of Nunavut) living in remote communities must travel thousands of kilometers to southern hospitals (Ottawa, Edmonton, and Winnipeg) to receive pediatric assessment, therapies (physio, occupational, speech, and behaviour), and counselling. Emerging from concerns of Nunavummiut families, the proposed study aims to 1. gather family, education, and health service provider perspectives to outline the day to day challenges and obstacles faced by care providers for children with autistic behaviours in remote communities of NU; and 2. Support the development of ASD services and program objectives that reflect Inuit specific frameworks of child development, family and community support. By embracing Inuit methodology of Piliriqatigiinniq (working together for the common good), this study is a timely engagement that responds to Qikiqtani Truth Commission’s Call for immediate government action to provide people of NU equitable and accessible programs and services at a local-level. Building on community partnerships consistent with Inuit knowledge production and self-determination this study will truly service the needs of Nunavummiut by understanding what strategies and health services (if any) Inuit seek and value when caring for children who display ASD behaviours.