Events

Please find below a list of some of the activities (talks, seminars, workshops, etc.) carried out at our center during the last seven years.

July – October 2019

April – June 2019

January – March 2019

October – December 2018

July – September 2018

April – June 2018

January – March 2018

October – December 2017

April – June 2017

January – March 2017

October – December 2016

April – June 2016

January – March 2016

October – December 2015

July -September 2015

April – June 2015

January – March 2015

October – December 2014

July – September 2014

April – June 2014

January – March 2014

October – December 2013

July – September 2013

April – June 2013

January -March 2013

 October – December 2012

July – September 2012

April – June 2012

January – March 2012

October – December 2011

 

 

 

Oct
29
Tue
IAS-Research Seminar by Guglielmo Militello (UPV/EHU): “Motility Control of Symbionts and Organelles by the Eukaryotic Cell” @ Centro Santamaria B14
Oct 29 @ 11:30 – 13:30

Motility Control of Symbionts and Organelles by the Eukaryotic Cell

Guglielmo Militello

Tuesday 29 at 11:30 (Centro Carlos Santamaria B14)

 

Motility occupies a decisive role in an organism’s ability to autonomously interact with its environment. However, collective biological organizations exhibit individual parts, which have temporally or definitively lost their motor capacities, but still able to autonomously interact with their host. Indeed, although the flagella of bacterial symbionts of eukaryotic cells are usually inhibited or lost, they autonomously modify the environment provided by their host. Furthermore, the eukaryotic organelles of endosymbiotic origin (i.e., mitochondria and plastids) are no longer able to move autonomously; nonetheless, they make a cytoskeletal-driven motion that allows them to communicate with other eukaryotic cells and to perform a considerable number of physiological functions. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to investigate how changes in the motile capacities of the parts of a nested biological organization affect their interactive autonomy; second, to examine how the modification of the interactive autonomy of the individual parts influences the constitutive autonomy of the collective association as a whole. The article argues that the emergence and maintenance of collective biological identities involves a strict control of the motile abilities of their constituting members. This entails a restriction, but not necessarily a complete loss, of the agential capacities of the individual parts.